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storyinmemo92 karma

Prime example: New York City used to have these in the days before they switched to one way grids and timer-only lights (and later centralized control). Since a walk signal was guaranteed and reacting to the button could only break the timing on one-way flow, they were disconnected. It costs more money to remove than to simply chop the wire, so they stayed at many intersections for a long time despite not doing anything functional (anymore).

storyinmemo57 karma

I can't remember the scene, so I'll say this:

  • The part about the traffic signals turning green in multiple directions as in Live Free or Die Hard where cars crash into each other can't happen. See the bit about conflict matrix. If conflicting directions get a green, the conflict system ignores the logic controller and just flashes red or flashes yellow.
  • Some large cities have centralized traffic control and can command individual lights, so in New York City it would be possible to greenlight a certain path to improve flow. Here's an press release detailing the installation of a system like this in Montreal: http://newsroom.transcore.com/press-release/city-montreal-deploys-transcores-transsuite-advanced-traffic-management-system-citywid

While I'm on common movie flaws, sprinklers don't activate for a whole room at once, even if the fire alarm goes off. The normal system you'll see is one where a small glass bulb with liquid that expands at a certain temperature is installed in every sprinkler head and each sprinkler is individually activated by the the temperature becoming too high. Systems where every sprinkler goes off at the same time do exist (deluge systems), but they're typically only found in industrial environments with special requirements. You'll never find that in an office building.

storyinmemo18 karma

I'm very curious about the how you handle the impact of HIV when it comes to forming relationships and seeking physical intimacy with others. When do you let somebody know, what steps do you take, do you look for somebody else who is also affected, and how does this all play into your plans for fatherhood that you've mentioned in another comment?

storyinmemo2 karma

Alex says the official answer to that is no.

storyinmemo2 karma

Step over to /r/firefighting or /r/ems and have a chat with them. Having worked in a rig for a bit, I'd say your chances of transmission to a patient or other responder are very, very low and that shouldn't discourage you. If you're taking proper precautions to protect yourself like everybody should, then you're also protecting the patient. Having an HIV+ partner on the rig wouldn't raise my concern for myself, and HIV+ patients are usually "risky" only when they have developed AIDS complications such as hepatitis.

Police might be a bit tougher since that is more likely to lead to altercations, so I can understand that more easily.