Hi, everyone. I'm Ned Colletti, General Manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers from 2006-2014. I'm currently promoting my new book THE BIG CHAIR. You can buy it here: http://bit.ly/2yobxjn

Before the Dodgers, I was an assistant General Manager of the San Francisco Giants after getting my start with the Chicago Cubs (my home team). Currently, I'm a baseball analyst on Spectrum SportsNet LA.

Proof: https://twitter.com/realnedcolletti/status/919963754254569477

Ask me anything - I'm ready!

UPDATE: Great questions all around - we had fun! More questions than I could answer . . . thanks for having me, Reddit!

Comments: 157 • Responses: 25  • Date: 

SlimJimMagoo67 karma

Hi, Ned!

What was it that you saw in Justin Turner that no other team did? Scouting reports? Or was it just this gut feeling? Definitely one of your best moves during your tenure as GM, so thank you!

NedColletti132 karma

We had decided to not resign three very good players - Skip Shumaker, Nick Punto and Jerry Hairston, Jr. I felt we needed a younger player who could play multiple positions. JT was a good offensive player at that point. He was also younger. He was from LA so he knew how special the Dodgers are. We thought he was going to be an average fielder and a good hitter. He has turned out to be a tremendous hitter, defender and leader. He worked during the off-seasons to go from a solid utility player, to a star on a great team. Hard work paid off for him. Very proud of him.

LuckyWarrior48 karma

Your most hectic trade deadline/winter meeting story?

NedColletti97 karma

Acquiring Manny Ramirez on July 31, 2008 from Boston. Some cool detail in the book.

beachlyf4me35 karma

Hey Ned!!! Exciting times in Dodgerland these days....and we owe a lot of it to you!!!

Most underrated food in Chavez Ravine?

NedColletti24 karma

Thank you. Many people for many years worked, made tough decisions and sacrificed a lot to have a team like the 2017 Dodgers.

anthrofighter24 karma

Ned, how excited are you see a NL Pennant coming our way soon?

NedColletti79 karma

Well, there is still another game to win - typically the last one is the hardest to win. If that would come to pass, I don't know that I have the words to explain what it really means to me. Winning is difficult; winning a pennant is so very difficult. It would be one of the grandest highlights of my life and professional career. And it would put the franchise in position, for the all-time professional highlight, a World Series Championship.

Wraithfighter23 karma

Okay, here's a tricky question for you...

If you had to convince a San Francisco Giants fan to root for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NLCS and World Series, what would you say?

(and yes, I'm a Giants Fan :D )

NedColletti45 karma

I could say because I'm a great guy and therefore you should root for the Dodgers. But not sure that will sway you. Because they are a National League team and you are an NL fan. And because I don't ever root against anyone; I root for people and teams. For a couple of weeks, it may be an interesting reversal for you!

jojoleigh12322 karma

What was the most exciting part of being GM of the Dodgers?

NedColletti32 karma

The chance to compete every day and be part of an iconic franchise. I love to compete and team build - both those in uniform and also the executive/analytical/scouting/player development ranks. To have that opportunity daily was very cool.

nucc214817 karma

What makes the Dodgers a special team?

NedColletti57 karma

The Dodgers are very talented to start with; but that doesn't make it a championship calibre team. They are a close knit group and they play smart and pay attention to every detail of the game. Offensively, they make pitchers throw strikes - they don't chase out of the zone. From the mound, they don't walk many hitters and their pitching plans are sound. They are also an unselfish group. Dave Roberts and the front office have done a tremendous job of building, sustaining and fortifying a winning culture. That's what makes them special IMO.

UhhBonelessDinger14 karma

Hey Ned. What was your honest projection of Kershaw when you drafted him? Hes been a blast to watch.

NedColletti51 karma

I thought he had a chance to be the ace of a staff or at least a number 2 starter. I don't think anyone could project an 18-year-old to be a Hall of Famer. The number of twists and turns a career can take are many. The growth I have seen in him from June 2006, has been enormous - both on and off the field. He is a once-in-a-generation pitcher and an even better person.

Kperry3111 karma

How much do you enjoy teaching at Pepperdine?

NedColletti10 karma

I love teaching at Pepperdine University. It has been one of the best opportunities I have ever had. The Sports Management program there is growing and leadership is adding very smart staff, people who are not only intellectual, but also have successful in-the-field experience. It has provided me with an opportunity to give back some of the blessings I have been given. I find so many parts of my career, I can now explain to a young person and perhaps help them in their lives and careers. The students have been excellent. They are first and foremost, wonderful people. They provide me with hope. They also teach me.

BBFriendshipExpress8 karma

What is it like becoming an analyst from SNLA?

Thank Ned!

NedColletti13 karma

It has been a great experience working with SNLA. The people who comprise the staff are some of the finest people I have ever been around. It is a wonderful team of people. It has kept me connected to the game and to the Dodgers. It has been a challenge for me as well.

Kitten_of_Death7 karma

Hey Ned!

What was it like being a GM in the midst of ownership drama? Did it ever impact your day-to-day? Was it something that didn't actually matter much?

Also,

If/when you played (at any level), what was your favorite position to play?

NedColletti13 karma

I learned a lot during those years from some very smart people. Including i had to figure out what in life, if anything, I could control and effect in a positive way. There was a lot going on that I/we couldn't change. I learned to stay focused on what I was in charge of and what I could make better. Everything else I had to let go of. It was an incredible learning experience. I played second base and centerfield. I loved playing and competing. The breaking ball made me an executive.

turningxpoint917 karma

Hello Ned,

Are there any conflicting feelings watching the Dodgers, the team you are associated with professionally, and the Cubs, your childhood team, facing each other?

NedColletti16 karma

None...I have a lot of my life sown into the fabric of the Dodgers. I have been a part of the organization for the last dozen years. Although I have loved what I have been able to do for many years, I have sacrificed a lot along the way. I want to see it through and I want the Dodgers to win it all. Without any doubt.

derekcanmexit6 karma

How did you get your start working in baseball? Who was your mentor while you were building your baseball career? What advice would you give to someone who is trying to break into the industry?

NedColletti10 karma

I had many mentors in baseball. During my early years with the Cubs it was Dallas Green and Jim Finks - two of the greatest leaders I have ever been around. I learned from very wise and smart baseball men - Don Zimmer, Jim Frey, John Vukovich, Lee Elia, Billy Connors. In SF, it was Dusty Baker and Bob Quinn and one of the wisest men I have ever met - Felipe Alou. Of course, Brian Sabean is also someone who taught me a lot. In LA, it was a pleasure to work with Joe Torre - smart, wise, successful - and Don Mattingly - one of the best hitters during his playing career and an extremely hard worker. My advice is to get in the door - don't pass on opportunities because it isn't the perfect job. Once you have a chance, prove to leadership that you are talented, honorable, relentless, humble and have integrity - out work everyone - first in; last out, day after day. Maximize what you have a chance to control: effort, thought-process, dedication, etc.

teeohdeedee1236 karma

What's your favorite pizza place in Chicago?

NedColletti33 karma

Momma Maria's...western suburbs...not a chain...but very good. Thin crust the best!

wemissyoujose5 karma

How were you able to work yourself up to one of the highest positions in the organization with such an unusual starting point in the game?

NedColletti12 karma

I have never been the smartest person in any room. I was relentless in my approach. I would do the jobs no one wanted to do and I would do them to the utmost. I never gave up. More than anything, I was blessed beyond measure.

Ralphdaddy134 karma

Hi Ned! Can't wait to read your new book. It's on my wish list to the Wife :) my question is... Greg Maddux. What made him so dominating with a fastball in the Mid 80's?

NedColletti14 karma

Thought process, clean delivery, photographic memory, genius, fearless, ability to execute.

VinForPrez4 karma

Hey Ned!

  1. How special was it to draft/watch Kershaw develop, and are we appreciating what we are witnessing with his career enough?

  2. Similar question as Kershaw, but did you ever envision Kenley becoming who he is now as a closer and more importantly a leader?

Thank you for taking the time to do this!

NedColletti8 karma

Kenley had so much ability and he understood pitching because of being a catcher. There was a pretty good chance that he would become who he is now. But it took time, hard work, learning and execution on his part. His numbers - while in a smaller sample size - are Mariano Rivera like. Professionally, he is so dedicated to this team, fan base and city. And, yes, his leadership has become apparent in a big way.

ObamaBigBlackCaucus3 karma

My friend Tyler is getting married in a few months. Do you have any words of advice for him? He's a huge Giants fan, for what it's worth.

NedColletti6 karma

always be kind...kindness rules.

23baseball33 karma

What work did you have to do to prepare for being an analyst?

What's your favorite play in baseball?

Thanks for coming on Reddit!

NedColletti9 karma

Preparation on the opponent, on the Dodgers always a key. Understanding how a show works was something I had to learn. But I had great teachers at SNLA. Research and preparation two keys to being good at anything.

My favorite play in baseball is the handshake after a victory.

ConceptualConcrete3 karma

What was it like working with Brian Sabean?

NedColletti8 karma

Brian is one of the smartest people I have ever known. He was not territorial. He gave me the opportunity to make trades (with his approval of course), to sign numerous players. He had the best feel of anyone I have ever worked with when it comes to the timing of decision-making. A Hall of Fame GM and a great friend. Although when we competed against each other, we rarely ever spoke to each other during the season.

Gallade33 karma

What was something that you had to do as a part of your job that the average fan wouldn't think of?

NedColletti10 karma

Well that's a great question. I think there are many critical considerations, one is: Patience is indeed a virtue and it is tough to always possess, but it is mandatory. Hard to do with a sport that plays pretty much every day for 6-7 months. I evaluated in very small increments. Plus, there is always a lot more going on behind-the-scenes that fans are not privy too.

LongBeach4Life3 karma

Ned- thank you for everything! Fun question, what's your favorite pasta dish?

NedColletti6 karma

Chicken Vesuvio...Mario's Table or Tufano's...both Chicago landmarks. family owned...il Pastaio in Beverly Hills my favorite LA spot...although they don't have the Vesuvio, the mezzaluna there is excellent.

rickmuscles3 karma

What's the funniest prank you've ever witnessed in the club house?

NedColletti9 karma

too many to write down..

chrisgilbertcreative3 karma

Hi Ned, do you have a favorite behind the scenes Juan Uribe story?

NedColletti6 karma

a few...was a big time player when the heat was on...

nucc21481 karma

Do you think the Dodgers would ever go back to Brooklyn?

NedColletti16 karma

only to visit...